Information Technology Law

How to Dominate the Internet: Book One: Protect Your Brand: Chapter 10 of 10: Commercialise your IP

September 7, 2010 Corporate and Commercial

Once you have fortified your brand with various turrets of IP protection, you may wish to commercialise it. Commercialisation can take many forms, the most common of which are selling outright through either share or asset purchase, licensing and franchising, together with many other different species of commercial agreement.

Read the full blawg post →

How to Dominate the Internet: Book One: Protect Your BranD: Chapter 8 of 10: Look and Feel

August 25, 2010 Corporate and Commercial

The approach taken in Navitaire was reaffirmed in the recent decision in Nova v Mazooma Games, where it was similarly held that the reproduction of the look and feel of an existing program in original source code did not infringe copyright in the original program. However, both Navitaire and Nova concern programs with high levels of abstraction and may be limited to their facts. It is therefore entirely possible that the “look and feel” of a program in a future case may be protected if there are less abstract concepts and closer similarities between programs. Thus, we may not have seen the end of “look and feel” protection through copyright.

Read the full blawg post →

How to Dominate the Internet: Book One: Protect Your Brand: Chapter 7 of 10: Business Method Patents

August 24, 2010 Corporate and Commercial

WardblawG has 30,000 very meaningful hits to its name, although 1000 of which have probably been made by me, my family and friends. Thank you to everyone who has viewed, subscribed and commented. As promised, today’s post is Chapter 7 of 10: Business Method Patents. Chapters 8, 9 and 10 shall follow, with Part 10 being published on my first day as a qualified solicitor in Scotland.

Read the full blawg post →

How to Dominate the Internet: Book One: Protect Your Brand: Chapter 5 of 10: Creative Commons Licences

August 22, 2010 Creative Commons

WardblawG uses one of the most common types of Creative Commons. See the CCL summary page and the full licence for more information. There are other different types of Creative Commons that may be considered.
By saying you grant a certain type of Creative Commons Licence, you are doing just that: no fancy legal documents required, because they’ve already been drafted for you. In case you haven’t discovered by now, WardblawG is a massive fan of freeing up information and keeping it simple. Welcome to FOI 2.0?

Read the full blawg post →

How to Dominate the Internet: Book One: Protect Your Brand: Prologue

August 18, 2010 Intellectual Property

This blawg was founded on 23 May 2010. I decided that, instead of mainly writing articles for other journals, I would like to write articles to share legal information with a wider audience. I am a proponent of social media networking and believe that law students, lawyers and law firms have a great deal of valuable information that should be shared in an optimal manner.

Read the full blawg post →

RSSatisfaction-in: A little more conversation

July 20, 2010 E-marketing

As the WardblawG surpasses the 5000 hit mark after only 3 weeks, I have now included two permanent RSS feeds at either side of this blog to “Scots Law” and “Scottish Law” through Google News, which highlight excerpts from quality articles discussing the most recent developments in Scots law, such as through the Scotsman’s or the Herald’s legal journalists.

Similar Google News feeds, as I have already mentioned , can be used to keep track of different clients, industries, technologies, law, and even matters or disputes: A little more action, a little less bark (from clients) and a lot more spark!

Read the full blawg post →

RSS Feeds: the Practical and Legal Considerations

July 5, 2010 Corporate and Commercial

Since starting this blog, I’ve placed emphasis on RSS feeds. Colleagues and readers have been quizzing me on why a legal blog needs RSS feeds and why I don’t spend more time on posts. The reason is that RSS feeds are important tools for modern lawyers and, indeed, professionals around the world. Because of that, I thought it would be useful to set out the practical and legal issues that should be noted and distinguished in order to exploit RSS to its fullest.

In my own experience, RSS feeds avoid the spam-like nature of email updates and allow for fast browsing of updates that suits you, which can help increase your efficiency, productivity, learning and knowledge. Obviously, that demands some initiative on your part, but if you can appreciate how much effort went into each and every post to which the RSS feed links, then it doesn’t take too much effort to get out there and start looking for RSS feeds relevant to you and your clients, such that you can build a collection, much like I have at the foot of this page, for your own personal and commercial purposes.

Alternatively, of course, you could just come to this site to view them all at once. But where’s the fun, (or plug?) in that?

Read the full blawg post →