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October 2010

How to write a first class dissertation: Chapter 2: New Propositions

October 28, 2010 Academia

Another thing that truly separates a first class dissertation from a second class one is discussion of ideas and issues that have never before been discussed. The following is an example of such a proposition and discussion, all of which stemmed from one footnote in an academic article that said a certain proposition “had never been discussed before in the courts of the UK”. Finding this loophole was essential to the dissertation’s success.

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How to write a first class dissertation: Chapter 2: Consider the Future

October 26, 2010 Academia

Tip: Suggest Improvements for the Future It may be that, in the course of the research for your dissertation, you discover previous decisions and actions that may happen again in the future. You may want to suggest that there is such a risk in the future and that there are ways in which that risk […]

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Supreme Court holds Scots Law breaches Art 6 ECHR | Cadder

October 26, 2010 Criminal

The Supreme Court has on Tuesday 26 October 2010 held that Scots law breaches the right to a fair trial under Art 6 ECHR by not allowing lawyers to advise detainees in Police stations. The case, on appeal, is called Cadder. This is a big day for Scots law.

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How to write a first class dissertation: Chapter 2: Argument

October 25, 2010 Academia

Having set the scene, it is time to delve straight into comment and opinion, drawing on relevant facts and law where required. Where possible, suggest ways in which events or decisions could have been improved and do not be afraid to say that commentators, judges or even powerful institutions, like the ECJ, got it wrong.

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How to write a first class dissertation: Chapter 2: Main Body Intro

October 24, 2010 Academia

Comment on writing the first main chunk of your first class dissertation

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How to write a first class dissertation: Chapter 1: Set the scene

October 23, 2010 Human Rights

Chapter 1: Setting the scene Depending on the nature of your dissertation, you may need to set the scene further. In a legal dissertation, by “scene” is meant the bits of law that are relevant to set up key arguments in the main body of the dissertation. With this example dissertation, the target readership was, […]

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How to write a first class dissertation: The Introduction

October 22, 2010 Academia

Together with the conclusion, the introduction is one of the most significant pieces of a dissertation that you have to get right. A well-written introduction can make all the difference between a first class and an upper second.

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How to write a first class dissertation: Content and Structure

October 21, 2010 Academia

How to write a first class dissertation: Content and Structure Three tips can be suggested to get you started on the right foot: First, research the subject in which you are most interested in writing about for your dissertation, then choose a sufficiently narrow angle to approach the subject or choose something that hasn’t been […]

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How to write a first class dissertation: Foreword

October 21, 2010 Academia

Centred on a narrow topic of international private law and human rights, this dissertation received a first class honours award from the University of Glasgow in 2007 under Dr Janeen Carruthers and Professor Elizabeth Crawford, and was verified externally by Professor Richard Fentiman of Cambridge University.

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Why do universities not publish student-generated content online for free?

October 14, 2010 IP & Technology Law

Each year across the world, each university demands that its students submit essays and dissertations electronically. But very little of that work is published online for the world to read. If it was so published, the knowledge contained within would be shared with billions of people around the planet. It follows that students would gain greater incentive to make their work of better quality. So, why not publish worldwide? Below are outlined the current trends towards emphasis on virtual learning and information dissemination through social media, followed by suggested reasons for universities not publishing students’ work more for free, concluding with a recommended course of action for all universities throughout the world to consider.

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Every Little Helps: “Tesco Law” approved in Scotland

October 7, 2010 Law Practice

Will we see more traineeships being opened up? Will equity partners earn even more than their hundreds of thousands or millions of pounds each year? Or will equity partners be more likely to sell their stake and escape the practice of law? What effect for management decisions? Will we see greater outsourcing? Will cloud computing be more fully embraced? Will Lawsoft’s stranglehold on legal software be broken up? Will Scots law merge into English law, or will it flourish more by itself?

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Gavin Ward’s WardblawG Update on YouTube

October 4, 2010 General Legal

Gavin Ward of WardblawG giving a presentation on YouTube regarding recent updates to the site.

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